Northam Central

Welcome to Northam Central. Jeremy's much more than a man in a hat!

7 notes

dukeofavon:

Favourite Movies: 4/infinite
An Ideal Husband
" -The higher education of men is what I should like to see. Men need it so sadly.
-They do, dear. But I’m afraid such a scheme would be quite unpractical. I don’t think man has much capacity for development. He has got as far as he can, and that is not far, is it?”
" - Aren’t you going to congratulate me?
  - Congratulations.
  - Aren’t you going to ask what for?
  - What for?
  - I’ve made a great decision. I’ve decided to get married.
  - My God! Who to?
  - That part is yet to be decided.”

dukeofavon:


Favourite Movies: 4/infinite

An Ideal Husband

" -The higher education of men is what I should like to see. Men need it so sadly.

-They do, dear. But I’m afraid such a scheme would be quite unpractical. I don’t think man has much capacity for development. He has got as far as he can, and that is not far, is it?”

" - Aren’t you going to congratulate me?

  - Congratulations.

  - Aren’t you going to ask what for?

  - What for?

  - I’ve made a great decision. I’ve decided to get married.

  - My God! Who to?

  - That part is yet to be decided.”

Filed under An Ideal Husband Jeremy Northam Cate Blanchett movie lines movie still

11 notes

universitybookstore:

"There was a meadow full of young hay, and all the summer flowers in great abundance. Blue cornflowers, scarlet poppies, gold buttercups, a veil of speedwells, an intricate carpet of daisies where the grass was shorter, scabious, yellow snapdragons, bacon and egg plant, pale milkmaids, purple heartsease, scarlet pimpernel and white shepherd’s purse, and round this field a high bordering hedge of Queen Anne’s lace and foxgloves, and above that dogroses, palely shining in a thorny hedge, honeysuckle all creamy and sweet-smelling, rambling threads of bryony and the dark stars of deadly nightshade. It was abundant, it seemed as though it must go on shining forever. The grasses had an enamelled gloss and were connected by diamond-threads of light. The larks sang, and the thrushes, and the blackbirds, sweet and clear, and there were butterflies everywhere, blue, sulphur, copper, and fragile white, dipping from flower to flower, from clover to vetch to larkspur, seeing their own guiding visions of invisible violet pentagrams and spiralling coils of petal-light."

—from Possession

Summer as only A. S. Byatt could describe it.

Lovely! Beautiful passage from a favorite novel. Just one thing is missing from that description…

There! Now it’s perfect. 

Filed under Possession A.S. Byatt Randolph Henry Ash Jeremy Northam making the world a little more beautiful since 1961

321 notes

carmen001:

On this day in 1817, died the English writer Jane Austen, who wrote works like “Pride and Prejudice” and “Sense and Sensibility.

"I have lost a treasure, such a sister, such a friend as never can have been surpassed. She was the sun of my life, the gilder of every pleasure, the soother of every sorrow; I had not a thought concealed from her, and it is as if I had lost a part of myself"-her sister, Cassandra Austen.

Early in 1816, Jane Austen began to feel unwell. She ignored her illness at first and continued to work and to participate in the usual round of family activities. By the middle of that year, her decline was unmistakable to Austen and to her family, and Austen’s physical condition began a long, slow, and irregular deterioration culminating in her death the following year.

Austen continued to work in spite of her illness.  Austen made light of her condition to others, describing it as “Bile” and rheumatism, but as her disease progressed she experienced increasing difficulty walking or finding the energy for other activities.
By mid-April, Austen was confined to her bed. In May, Cassandra and Henry escorted Jane to Winchester for medical treatment. Austen died in Winchester on 18 July 1817, at the age of 41. Henry, through his clerical connections, arranged for his sister to be buried in the north aisle of the nave of Winchester Cathedral.

“The more I read the more I admire and respect and do reverence… When she looks straight at a man or a woman, she is greater than those who were alive with her - by a whole head… with a more delicate hand and a keener scalpel…”-Rudyard Kipling, who was a great admirer of Jane.

(via dramadork884)

Filed under Jane Austen 200 years gone by and still inspiring devotion and admiration NJR